Don’t assume that tendering is purely price-driven – it rarely is.

Supplying good and services to government can be a  lucrative additional revenue stream for SMEs, but it’s not always easy to know how to best showcase your business so you stand out from competitors.
 
To help businesses learn how to maximise opportunities to supply goods and services to government agencies, the NSW Department of Industry is holding a series of free Procurement Workshops  throughout NSW.
 
To be held during September and October, there will be two streams targeting all businesses, as well as a specific series focused on Aboriginal owned and operated businesses.
 
Topics will include: 
What opportunities are coming up
How government purchasing works
How to set your business up for success
How to connect to support to help your business grow

To register for a free event in your area click here
 
How to write a great tender
To help you secure your piece of the pie, Charisse Gray from Business Propel has these tips for writing a terrific tender:
 
1. Don’t be complacent about your relationship with the customer - never assume that the business is yours even if you are the existing incumbent. And never underestimate your competition.
 
2. Don’t assume that tendering is purely price-driven - it rarely is. You need to demonstrate your ability to service the requirements efficiently and effectively. A supplier that can demonstrate capability to deliver the service at a cost effective rate will win over a cheaper supplier who has not demonstrated capability or value for money.
 
3. Always keep the buyer's specific requirements in mind when preparing the solution – you must demonstrate your understanding of what the buyer wants even if the buyer does not know what they really want.
 
4. Always follow the protocol outlined in the document regarding questions, site visits, briefing sessions and so forth. The buyer put the process in there for a reason.
 
5. Always ensure you can deliver what you say you can in the document.
 
6. Address and demonstrate your ability to meet all selection criteria outlined in the document.  Enclose a table with a reference to the section in the response that would address that selection point, or create a response to how you would address that selection point.
 
7. Never leave an answer such as "Noted and agreed/Read and understood”. You must address every question or statement with an answer that is to the point and demonstrates your organisation's understanding of what the question is about.
 
8. Don’t include irrelevant material, or marketing material just to pad or fill the document.
 
9. Provide full contact details, including name of key contact, phone number, email address, office address. Check that the customer’s information is correct.
 
10. Get a person who has not been involved in the preparation of the document to do a final sanity check. Get them to proof for minor grammatical and other editorial issues.
 
11. Don’t leave delivery of the document until the last minute – you can't foresee what could inadvertently hold up the delivery.  
 
12. Always ask for a debriefing after the outcome to gain an understanding of why your tender succeeded/lost; that way you can understand your strengths and weaknesses, enabling you to improve future responses.
 
Need help writing a business plan? Business Propel  can help you generate a one page plan for your business in five easy steps.
Don’t assume that tendering is purely price-driven - it rarely is. You need to demonstrate your ability to service the requirements efficiently and effectively.